Library Blogging: Tasks #5 & 6 (Flickr)

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I’ve had a Shutterfly account for a couple of years now, so while I await word from our IT specialist as to whether or not I can use that for Tasks #5 & 6, I’ll assume it’s okay and use that one. One of the complaints I’ve heard about the Webolution project is that it requires participants to open (and thus maintain) multiple accounts (which in turn require multiple usernames and passwords).

I don’t really have a problem with that part of it (I have at least six or seven different email accounts, 2 blogs, and 2-going-on-3 Web sites, and that doesn’t include all the banking accounts, Amazon.com, Netflix, brokerage accounts, blah blah blah. Oh, and of course, my library account.), but I’d prefer not to duplicate something unless absolutely necessary.

[Sidenote: Anyone heard of this absolutely brilliant invention called Bugmenot? Some enterprising and gracious individual set up this site to cull account names and passwords that anyone can use to access sites that typically require users to enroll for free (e.g., the New York Times). Of course, nothing ever really is free, so in exchange for access you give up your email address, name, and oftentimes a physical address, phone number, birthday, fax number, etc. Some of the major sites have begun to catch on to Bugmenot, so that it can be difficult to find a username/password combo that’s not blocked, but if you’re a patient person it’s still a goldmine.]

Anyhoo, I lurv Shutterfly because it’s so simple to use and share photos to anyone online (or, conversely, to limit viewing to individuals you choose). As B. and I had a wedding photography business, we had tons of photos to upload online so that we could order prints for customers. We haven’t quite updated it in awhile, but it does have photos from one of our last wedding assignments, as well as shots from our big backpacking trip in 2002.

Not too bad, and I noticed that Shutterfly has changed a bit since the last time I was on it. Or maybe I just didn’t pay much attention to its amenities. But with B. planning on reviving his photography work and exhibiting and selling some of his prints next month, now’s as good a time as any to get back to working on getting his online presence up and running again.

I know I should try Flickr. I’m a complete online junkie, and I love all the hidden treasures lurking in the corners of the Internet that aren’t just fun but also free!!! But they can also be such time-suckers, and as I’m on this efficiency kick and absolutely abhor timewasters, I’m reluctant to just dive in and sample all the wares.

Of course, if I’m being paid to do it…and I’m encouraged to do it on company time…Well. How can I possibly refuse?

MRA

Library Blogging: Tasks #5 & 6 (Flickr)

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I’ve had a Shutterfly account for a couple of years now, so while I await word from our IT specialist as to whether or not I can use that for Tasks #5 & 6, I’ll assume it’s okay and use that one. One of the complaints I’ve heard about the Webolution project is that it requires participants to open (and thus maintain) multiple accounts (which in turn require multiple usernames and passwords).

I don’t really have a problem with that part of it (I have at least six or seven different email accounts, 2 blogs, and 2-going-on-3 Web sites, and that doesn’t include all the banking accounts, Amazon.com, Netflix, brokerage accounts, blah blah blah. Oh, and of course, my library account.), but I’d prefer not to duplicate something unless absolutely necessary.

[Sidenote: Anyone heard of this absolutely brilliant invention called Bugmenot? Some enterprising and gracious individual set up this site to cull account names and passwords that anyone can use to access sites that typically require users to enroll for free (e.g., the New York Times). Of course, nothing ever really is free, so in exchange for access you give up your email address, name, and oftentimes a physical address, phone number, birthday, fax number, etc. Some of the major sites have begun to catch on to Bugmenot, so that it can be difficult to find a username/password combo that’s not blocked, but if you’re a patient person it’s still a goldmine.]

Anyhoo, I lurv Shutterfly because it’s so simple to use and share photos to anyone online (or, conversely, to limit viewing to individuals you choose). As B. and I had a wedding photography business, we had tons of photos to upload online so that we could order prints for customers. We haven’t quite updated it in awhile, but it does have photos from one of our last wedding assignments, as well as shots from our big backpacking trip in 2002.

Not too bad, and I noticed that Shutterfly has changed a bit since the last time I was on it. Or maybe I just didn’t pay much attention to its amenities. But with B. planning on reviving his photography work and exhibiting and selling some of his prints next month, now’s as good a time as any to get back to working on getting his online presence up and running again.

I know I should try Flickr. I’m a complete online junkie, and I love all the hidden treasures lurking in the corners of the Internet that aren’t just fun but also free!!! But they can also be such time-suckers, and as I’m on this efficiency kick and absolutely abhor timewasters, I’m reluctant to just dive in and sample all the wares.

Of course, if I’m being paid to do it…and I’m encouraged to do it on company time…Well. How can I possibly refuse?

MRA

Library Blogging: Task #1, 2, 3 & 4

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So. My workplace has decided to drag us all kicking and screaming into the postdigital age by having us perform 23 (?) tasks related to various Web applications. Tasks #1, 2, 3, and 4 involve blogging: learning about it, setting up a blog, exposing one’s library self to the world.

K.

To keep things simple, I’ll use this blog, although I’m reluctant introduce anything non-writing-related to it (as if that’s ever been a problem before). Library-related posts will be headlined thus: “Library Blogging: Task #X.” I’m supposed to report on my progress through the 23 (?) tasks via the blog. In other words, I get to time-suck on library time!!!

Task #2 was to read this missive. I can’t decide if it’s overly ambitious for overscheduled, overworked library staff, or if it’s awfully narrow-minded. I’m tempted to start my own list of Things to Do This Year, such as finish writing the damn novel, learn Swedish, get published in a major women’s magazine, learn to surf…that sort of thing. Am I really going to be lying on my deathbed muttering, “Ohhhhhh…I should’ve learned how to use Google Base. Is it too laaaaate?” Croak. Close curtain.

At least I’m already on Netflix. Are there really still people out there trekking out to Blockbuster?

Task #3 is to set up a blog. Again, the powers-that-be may live to regret this. It’s the topic du jour around the library, and who can blame them? How many of you guys out there are actually encouraged to blog on company time? And at the end of it, you’re given a chance to win a laptop if you faithfully record your progress. On your blog.

Did I mention that this is on company time?

MRA

Library Blogging: Task #1, 2, 3 & 4

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So. My workplace has decided to drag us all kicking and screaming into the postdigital age by having us perform 23 (?) tasks related to various Web applications. Tasks #1, 2, 3, and 4 involve blogging: learning about it, setting up a blog, exposing one’s library self to the world.

K.

To keep things simple, I’ll use this blog, although I’m reluctant introduce anything non-writing-related to it (as if that’s ever been a problem before). Library-related posts will be headlined thus: “Library Blogging: Task #X.” I’m supposed to report on my progress through the 23 (?) tasks via the blog. In other words, I get to time-suck on library time!!!

Task #2 was to read this missive. I can’t decide if it’s overly ambitious for overscheduled, overworked library staff, or if it’s awfully narrow-minded. I’m tempted to start my own list of Things to Do This Year, such as finish writing the damn novel, learn Swedish, get published in a major women’s magazine, learn to surf…that sort of thing. Am I really going to be lying on my deathbed muttering, “Ohhhhhh…I should’ve learned how to use Google Base. Is it too laaaaate?” Croak. Close curtain.

At least I’m already on Netflix. Are there really still people out there trekking out to Blockbuster?

Task #3 is to set up a blog. Again, the powers-that-be may live to regret this. It’s the topic du jour around the library, and who can blame them? How many of you guys out there are actually encouraged to blog on company time? And at the end of it, you’re given a chance to win a laptop if you faithfully record your progress. On your blog.

Did I mention that this is on company time?

MRA